The Use of Prolotherapy for Chondromalacia Patella (Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome)

Posted on Posted in Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 10 : 2018

Chondromalacia patella is a musculoskeletal pain disorder in which degeneration of cartilage underneath the patella can induce symptoms of pain, stiffness, and crepitus. If left untreated, it can often lead to knee osteoarthritis. Current treatments for chondromalacia patella (physical therapy, NSAIDs, etc.) are often ineffective and sometimes detrimental to the health of the knee. A proposed, alternative treatment currently provided to some patients is Prolotherapy, an injection technique used to stimulate the growth of new cells, including connective tissue.

The Ligament Injury-Osteoarthritis Connection: The Role of Prolotherapy in Ligament Repair and the Prevention of Osteoarthritis

Posted on Posted in Mark T. Wheaton, MD, Nichole Jensen, BS, Volume 3 : Issue 4 : December 2011

By Mark T. Wheaton, MD & Nicole Jensen, BS ABSTRACT Ligaments are specialized bands of fibrous connective tissue which hold bones in approximation, providing mechanical support and stability across a joint to allow for fluid joint motion and prevent excessive joint displacement. When ligaments are injured, structural, mechanical and physiologic changes occur and joint stability is compromised. A more »

Evidence-Based Use of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Musculoskeletal Pain: A Scientific Literature Review

Posted on Posted in Volume 3 : Issue 4 : December 2011

By Ross A. Hauser, MD, Marion A. Hauser, MS, RD, & Nicole M. Baird, CHFP ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate, through a scientific review of the current literature, the efficacy of dextrose Prolotherapy in treating musculoskeletal pain. Data Sources: All possible internet sources, especially online medical databases including PUBMED, PREMEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, HEALTHLINE, OMNIMEDICALSEARCH, MEDSCAPE and MEDLINE, were searched through October more »

Emails from Clive Sinoff, MD

Posted on Posted in Letters to the Editor

Email #1: Dr. Hauser and the entire publication staff should be congratulated on achieving the publication of this important journal. For reasons which I cannot comprehend, Prolotherapy has been ignored and greeted with hostility. This publication takes an important step in furthering the knowledge and use of this highly effective therapy. In the article by Hauser more »

The Acceleration of Articular Cartilage Degeneration in Osteoarthritis by Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

Posted on Posted in Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 2 : Issue 1 : February 2010, Wonder Why?

By Ross A. Hauser, MD ABSTRACT Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used drugs in the world for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms, and are taken by 20-30% of elderly people in developed countries. Because of the potential for significant side effects of these medications on the liver, stomach, gastrointestinal tract and more »

The Ligament Injury Connection to Osteoarthritis (Extended Version – Online Only)

Posted on Posted in Mark T. Wheaton, MD, Nichole Jensen, BS, Volume 2 : Issue 1 : February 2010, Wonder Why?

By Mark T. Wheaton, MD & Nichole Jensen ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis (OA) or degenerative joint disease (DJD) is more common than all the other types of arthritis combined. It is well-established that injury to a joint increases the chances that the joint will develop osteoarthritis over time. Precipitating causes include sudden impact or trauma, overuse or repetitive motion injuries, more »

The Deterioration of Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis by Corticosteroid Injections

Posted on Posted in Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 1 : Issue 2 : May 2009, Wonder Why?

By Ross A. Hauser, MD ABSTRACT The hallmark feature of osteoarthritis is the breakdown in the articular cartilage of joints such as the knee and hip. Both animal and human research has consistently shown that corticosteroid injections into normal and degenerated knees accelerate the arthritic process. A summary of the effects of the intraarticular corticosteroids on more »

Seven Literature Reviews

Posted on Posted in Cathy A. Skinkis, MA, It's A Wide Wide World, Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 1 : Issue 1 : February 2009

By Cathy A. Skinkis, MA & Ross A. Hauser, MD Besides our authors and readers commenting on their experiences with Prolotherapy, we hope to notify our readership about some of the more interesting articles published around the globe on Prolotherapy and painful conditions. Ultimately, we all benefit by continuing to educate ourselves on the latest research and publications regarding more »

The Regeneration of Articular Cartilage with Prolotherapy

Posted on Posted in Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 1 : Issue 1 : February 2009, Wonder Why?

By Ross A. Hauser, MD ABSTRACT What most people may not realize is that chondrocytes, the cells that make articular cartilage, are metabolically active. Chondrocytes proliferate and actively make articular cartilage. Osteoarthritis is an example of this, in that both the degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage are enhanced. It is well known that in osteoarthritis, more »

Prolotherapy Saved Me From Bilateral Knee Replacements!

Posted on Posted in Heather L. McCullough, MA, Volume 1 : Issue 1 : February 2009

By Alek Jakich & Heather L. McCullough, MA ABSTRACT This case study discusses the case of 56 year-old Alek Jakich, an avid body builder, who suffered from chronic, severe, debilitating bilateral knee pain who was told he needed bilateral knee replacements in order to have any chance at a semi-normal life again, but was told he would likely more »

Standard Clinical X-ray Studies Document Cartilage Regeneration in Five Degenerated Knees After Prolotherapy

Posted on Posted in Joseph J. Cukla, LPN, Remarkable Recoveries, Ross A. Hauser, MD, Volume 1 : Issue 1 : February 2009

By Ross A. Hauser, MD & Joseph J. Cukla, LPN ABSTRACT Degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis. The condition is marked by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage which is easily documented by standard X-ray studies. The regeneration of this articular cartilage in clinical practice has been difficult. Five knees with articular cartilage degeneration more »